In God We Trust

True literature is defined as “writing of enduring interest” thus, not every book written and published can fit this category; works of exceptionally-enduring interest are known as “Classics”.

SKU: 978-1-926825-71-7 Categories: ,

Description

True literature is defined as “writing of enduring interest” thus, not every book written and published can fit this category; works of exceptionally-enduring interest are known as “Classics”. Whether fictional, instructive, expressing opinions agreeing with, or contrary to, orthodoxy [such as religion, politics, etc.], all include a message of some sort. In this assertion, it must also be stated that not all messages are definable beyond complexity. Even outrageous works–poorly-written or incomparable to any genius [such as the 15th century book defining witchcraft called “Malleus Maleficarum”] have particular points of view relative to the writers’ thinking. Many popular works surviving their times do so despite the obvious faults that modernity can now define [among these, of course, is Scripture]. Reference literature, no matter how outdated, is most valuable for historians because it defines and determines how well one can either validate or repudiate the tradition upon which present trend is based; how wonderful it would be should the Library of Alexandria, once filled with some 40,000 or so hand-written manuscripts, not have been destroyed!