Spuraway 1911 to 2011

This is the fascinating story of a house that reflects the history of the North Shore: First

Nations, the lumber industry, the Capilano Japanese community, the incorporation of the

District of West Vancouver, the railway, the development of a farm and equestrian centre,

the effects of The Great Depression,

 

ISBN 978-1-77084-291-5



Description

This is the fascinating story of a house that reflects the history of the North Shore: First

Nations, the lumber industry, the Capilano Japanese community, the incorporation of the

District of West Vancouver, the railway, the development of a farm and equestrian centre,

the effects of The Great Depression, and finally the evolution into an apartment estate.

The log house that grew into a mansion is the centre of the story. Built by Japanese

carpenters, the most distinctive feature is log construction combined with a curved orientalstyle

roof and huge overhanging eaves, and includes an unusual carved stone fireplace of

Aboriginal and Japanese Ainu folk-art themes. This house is one of the oldest buildings in

West Vancouver and is largely original.

In the 1920s the log house was enlarged, other buildings were constructed and the estate

was named Spuraway by its second owner. The estate was a family home, a farm, an

equestrian centre, and served as a community centre as the owners welcomed friends,

neighbours, and community organizations to enjoy the facilities. Four families owned and

lived in the log house, left their enhancements, and brought it to life during its time as a

private residence.

 

ISBN 978-1-77084-291-5